Stalin’s Gulag – The Geography of Soviet Slavery

This… was not written ‘so that it will not happen again’, as the cliché would have it. This… was written because it almost certainly will happen again.

                                                                Anne Applebaum, Author of Gulag: A History

The Gulag is the most poignant expression of the psychopathic nature of Stalin’s regime. In 1922, just five years after the Bolsheviks had seized power, there were already eighty-four camps dotted across Russia. Faced with the vast numbers of prisoners they had arrested in the first decade of Soviet communism, the Politburo passed a resolution in 1929 officially establishing a network of corrective labour camps for ‘the colonisation of [remote] regions and the exploitation of their natural wealth through the work of prisoners [1].’  Continue reading

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De-civilisation – Stalin in Eastern Europe

As World War Two ended, Stalin’s occupation of eastern Europe provided him with the opportunity to impose his pathological vision upon eight separate European countries, each with a vastly different cultural, economic and political system. In doing so, he followed a clear blueprint for systematically dismantling the defences that each country had built to protect against tyranny. He began by undermining the rule of law.  Continue reading

The Soviet Gulag – Stalin’s Slave Camps

This… was not written ‘so that it will not happen again’, as the cliché would have it. This… was written because it almost certainly will happen again.

Anne Applebaum, Author of Gulag: A History

The Gulag is the most poignant expression of the psychopathic nature of Stalin’s regime. In 1922, just five years after the Bolsheviks had seized power, there were already eighty-four camps dotted across Russia. Faced with the vast numbers of prisoners they had arrested in the first decade of Soviet communism, the Politburo passed a resolution in 1929 officially establishing a network of corrective labour camps for ‘the colonisation of [remote] regions and the exploitation of their natural wealth through the work of prisoners[1].’      Continue reading

Stalin – A Psychopath in Power

Biographer Simon Sebag Montefiore [1] describes Stalin as a man who ruined every relationship and friendship in his life. A convinced Marxist fanatic whose messianic egoism was boundless; he was incapable of giving anyone happiness. While Stalin seldom attended executions or torture in person, he liked to hear in detail about the suffering of his victims and would shriek with laughter on hearing of their last desperate pleas for mercy. His greatest delight, he said was ‘to mark one’s enemy, prepare everything, avenge oneself thoroughly and then go to sleep.[2]’   Continue reading